If you managed to read my post last week about my learning communities you would have gathered an insight into how I see the value in professional online communities, but haven’t transitioned to become much of a connector.

Transitioning to a connector, for me, isn’t about believing in the value of connecting – I see those benefits everyday of teaching, but instead breaking out of my comfort zone. I’m a social media wallflower! Not just professionally, but also personally. I enjoy reading Facebook to catch up on what I miss when living overseas, but I rarely post (I haven’t done the math, but likely much less that the 1 per month Tweet).

For my personal social media, I’m not so worried about it, but professionally I want to practice what I preach. I want to further develop the connections I’ve made at workshops and conferences. I want to share my successes and learn from the dialogue with other amazing educators.

How can I break that habit?

My plan is to set a goal – 2 original posts per week sharing either a resource I’ve created that I’m proud of or something that was successful in my teaching. I want to share posts that are valuable to my followers, something that can spark an idea or challenge their thinking.

So, with that said, I’m starting with this Tweet. Fellow COETAILer and colleague, Flynn, invited me into his classroom yesterday to share one way he was transforming the way his students investigate how the earth has changed. Great lesson and a great way to get back into Twitter. Flynn takes complete credit for this – I only stopped by for a few minutes to share his success!

To jump to the other end of the spectrum, just last week I stumbled upon an article titled The Wikipedia contributor behind 2.5 million edits – the story of Steven Pruitt a 34 year-old Virginia man with over 2.5 million Wikipedia edits to his name. I think the tides are changing on how educators see Wikipedia (for the better, in my opinion) and it’s intriguing to get a better understanding on just how the over 6 million articles are Wikipedia are created and edited. An extremely valuable lesson for both our colleagues and students.

See you on Twitter!